A prison cell gate.

“As part of a disturbing agreement with Jeffrey Epstein, Maxwell identified, groomed, and abused multiple victims, while she enjoyed a life of extraordinary luxury and privilege.”

Prosecutors in their written arguments to the judge presiding over the case of Ghislaine Maxwell. They recommend she spend at least 30 years in prison for sexually abusing underage girls.

Published on

jun 23, 2022

Why It Matters: The trial of Ghislaine Maxwell was one of the "highest-profile cases to take place in the wake of the #MeToo movement" (Reuters). Federal prosecutors recommend a sentencing of 30-55 years in prison, based on their interpretation of the federal sentencing guidelines. The judge will announce Maxwell's prison sentence on Tuesday, June 28, in New York federal court.

  • Background: British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell went to court for her role in sexually abusing underage girls while in a relationship with her then-boyfriend Jeffrey Epstein. She was convicted in December for "sex trafficking and other crimes" but will not receive her sentencing until Tuesday (AP).
  • Prior to sentencing, lawyers send in sentencing submissions to proper authorities (the judge in this instance) recommending how many years, if any, a person should spend in prison.
  • In their submission, prosecutors wrote, “Maxwell was an adult who made her own choices. She made the choice to sexually exploit numerous underage girls. She made the choice to conspire with Epstein for years, working as partners in crime and causing devastating harm to vulnerable victims."
  • Maxwell's lawyers made their sentencing submission last week and recommended about 5 years in prison. In it, they wrote that Maxwell "cannot and should not bear all the punishment for which Epstein should have been held responsible."
  • Jeffrey Epstein committed suicide while in jail awaiting trial for sex trafficking charges in 2019.

Feds: Ghislaine Maxwell deserves at least 30 years in prison (Associated Press)

Maxwell deserves 30- to 55-year prison term - U.S. prosecutors (Reuters)

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