quick quotes

“I was blessed with a long life. I have seen the best and worst of this country...We lost everything that day. Our homes. Our churches. Our newspapers. Our theaters. Our lives.”

107-year-old Viola Fletcher, who was 7-years-old on the day of the Tulsa Race Massacre. President Biden is the first sitting President to visit Tulsa to mark 100-years since one of the worst incidents of racial violence in American history.

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    • Viola Fletcher testified in front of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties with others, including her brother (100-years-old), as to what happened May 31, and June 2, 1921.

    • Mrs. Fletcher went on to say: “_We, and our history, have been forgotten, washed away. This Congress must recognize us, and our history. For Black Americans. For white Americans. For all Americans. That’s some justice.”
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    • Some advocate for compensation for the victims and their families of the Tulsa Massacre. So far, that hasn’t happened.

    • Here’s how the Library of Congress describes what happened that day: _On May 31, 1921, Dick Rowland, a black man, is imprisoned for allegedly assaulting a white woman. By dawn the next day, Greenwood, known as “Black Wall Street” by some and “Little Africa” by others, lay in smoldering ruins. The Tulsa Race Massacre results in as many as 300 deaths and millions of dollars in property damage in one of the worst episodes of racial violence in American history.
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    • Why It Matters: The story of the Tulsa Race Massacre has grown in national prominence in recent years. President Biden is the first sitting president to visit Tulsa to commemorate 100-years since the event.

    Here’s several resources for more:

    A link to The Library of Congress research page and a list of newspaper stories from that day.

    The New York Times Interactive: What The Tulsa Race Massacre Destroyed

    The Presidential Proclamation on the Day of Remembrance

    Here’s the full link to Viola Fletcher’s testimony (begins at minute 23) (c-span link with testimony as well with her brother, 100-years-old)